HOLOGRAPHIC LETTER BY A MAN HEADING TO THE CALIFORNIA GOLD FIELDS, CRITICIZES ABOLITIONISTS
HOLOGRAPHIC LETTER BY A MAN HEADING TO THE CALIFORNIA GOLD FIELDS, CRITICIZES ABOLITIONISTS

HOLOGRAPHIC LETTER BY A MAN HEADING TO THE CALIFORNIA GOLD FIELDS, CRITICIZES ABOLITIONISTS

1850. A two-page letter written May 27, 1850 by a man named Albert to his brother back home in Oneida, New York. He writes from Mount Pleasant, Alabama, and mentions that he passed the winter and spring in the sunny South: "There is many things here that is fine in the climate, still I shall soon be off for the land of gold, where there is an untold millions that lies beneath its surface." Albert writes that he should "be in the digging" as soon as the middle of August. The California Gold Rush began in 1848, when gold was found at Sutter's Mill in Coloma, California. The news of gold brought some 300,000 people to California from the rest of the United States and abroad. In addition to his plans to head to the gold fields, Albert writes about his profitable work in corn speculation with his brother-in-law: "I have had a fine opportunity the past winter and spring to see the country and its plantations and niggers, it would do you good to see 84 plows in on field turning up the turf at one time followed by the same number of men and women niggers ... by the by, if the abolitionists don't stop their eternal clack it will positively cause a dissolution of this glorious union, think of it when the stars and stripes will set forever. God forbid if they could see the thing as it is they would hold their confounded noise." Written in black ink on a single leaf of light blue paper with creasing from prior folds, some light staining, and a few small closed tears. Item #71687

Price: $250.00

See all items in Americana