SCALE MODEL OF A SAN QUENTIN PRISON CELL BY THE SACRAMENTO SLAYER. Outsider Art, Morris Solomon, Jr, b.1944.
SCALE MODEL OF A SAN QUENTIN PRISON CELL BY THE SACRAMENTO SLAYER
SCALE MODEL OF A SAN QUENTIN PRISON CELL BY THE SACRAMENTO SLAYER
SCALE MODEL OF A SAN QUENTIN PRISON CELL BY THE SACRAMENTO SLAYER
SCALE MODEL OF A SAN QUENTIN PRISON CELL BY THE SACRAMENTO SLAYER

SCALE MODEL OF A SAN QUENTIN PRISON CELL BY THE SACRAMENTO SLAYER

circa 1995. Accompanied by a typed statement, which is affixed to the bottom of the removable ceiling cutout: “This model is a replica of the actual cell here at San Quentin. The dimension of the cells are four feet one half inch wide, eleven feet long and eight feet high. This model is built to scale of one inch per foot there [sic] approx, fifty five square feet of living space in a cell. On death row, only one inmate per cell but on the mainline there are two inmates per cell.” Hand-painted and highly detailed, the model measures 13 1/8” x 8” 4 3 / 4” and is composed of board, tape, and cellophane. The prisoner’s bunk, complete with blanket and pillow, is situated below ventilation ducts and near a toilet, sink, and storage unit. A winter landscape photograph appears on one sidewall, which can be viewed through a cellophane-covered window in the other. Opposite the back of the model are the prison bars, including a swiveling cell door. Beneath the model is a label bearing Solomon’s name, his identification and cell number, and the address for San Quentin. Undated, it appears to have been created around 1995. An African American Vietnam veteran who worked as a handyman in the Oak Park neighborhood of Sacramento, California, Morris Solomon Jr. was convicted of four counts of first-degree murder, two counts of second-degree murder, and five sexual assaults over the course of a year starting in 1986. Five of the victims were found buried outside the homes where Solomon lived or worked, while the sixth was “discovered” by Solomon in a closet at a house where he had been working. At Solomon’s sentencing, Sacramento Superior Court Judge Peter Mering added on a sentence of 95 years to life to make certain Solomon could never win release if his death sentence was overturned. “I can imagine no one whose release would be more terrifying to the community of Sacramento than Mr. Solomon,” the judge said. Solomon’s conviction was affirmed by the California Supreme Court on July 15, 2010. He remains on death row at San Quentin. Item #70589

Price: $1,200.00

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