PROHIBITION AND POLITICAL PERSUASION IN MISSOURI. Carl J. Henry.

PROHIBITION AND POLITICAL PERSUASION IN MISSOURI

1933. A small archive of 25 postcards sent in 1933 to Missouri State Senator Carl J. Henry, urging him to support the "local option" on the issue of prohibition of alcohol. Also included is a political postcard, urging a vote for Henry as state representative on the Democratic ticket. The 3 1/4 by 5 1/2 inch postcards are uniformly printed with unique handwritten and typed messages from constituents in Clinton, Missouri. All are dated December 4, 1933, the eve of the repeal of the 18th Amendment. "As one of your constituents living in a county that voted 'dry' by a strong majority, I humbly request that you give such counties the justice that rightfully belongs to them," one Mrs. Brownell wrote. In 1887, Missouri's legislature adopted a local option law and within 19 months, 61 of the state's 114 counties voted dry. Another 35 voted dry in the years that followed. Despite the adoption of the 21st Amendment, Missouri law still allowed the local option. However, the state soon thereafter adopted liquor control laws that superseded local law. Today, Missouri has no dry jurisdictions and it has become known as one of the least restrictive states when it comes to alcohol regulation. Some light toning to the postcards; else very good or better. Item #64652

Price: $500.00

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