1920s PHOTOGRAPHIC ALBUM OF NATIONAL PARKS IN THE U.S. AND CANADA. Photography – National Parks.
1920s PHOTOGRAPHIC ALBUM OF NATIONAL PARKS IN THE U.S. AND CANADA
1920s PHOTOGRAPHIC ALBUM OF NATIONAL PARKS IN THE U.S. AND CANADA
1920s PHOTOGRAPHIC ALBUM OF NATIONAL PARKS IN THE U.S. AND CANADA

1920s PHOTOGRAPHIC ALBUM OF NATIONAL PARKS IN THE U.S. AND CANADA

Remarkable photographic album of a 1926 grand tour of U.S. and Canadian national parks, featuring original prints from several prominent park photographers.
 
The oblong album contains a total of 431 black and white photographs with images from Yellowstone National Park, Mount Rainier National Park, and Banff National Park, as well as Winnipeg, Lake Louise, Victoria Glacier, Vancouver, Seattle, Victoria, Tacoma, Portland, etc. The black and white photos of varying sizes have been affixed to the black heavy paper album leaves. There are no annotations or ownership markings. 
 
The photo album contains a combination of professional purchased photos and candid shots. The tour begins in Canada and includes several photos of what appears to be a chauffeur driving two women in a 1920s convertible Pierce Arrow.
 
They traveled along the Windemere Auto Road in Banff, went on to Vancouver and Seattle, and visited Mount Rainer National Park, where they took part in a group hike along the glacier ice fields. The album contains three large sepia tone photos measuring 9 x 6.5 inches of the hiking group, including one showing them hiking through the Paradise Ice Caves, interconnected glacier caves that were closed in 1971 because they became too dangerous to enter. By 1993, the lower Paradise Glacier had melted, and the caves no longer exist. The caves were hollowed out by water running beneath the glacier.
 
From Washington, the travelers move on to Oregon. The album contains four panoramic photos measuring 10.5 x 3.5 inches by Cross & Dimmitt of waterfalls along the Columbia River highway, as well as one of the Mitchell's Point Tunnel that was designed by Oregon highway engineer John Arthur Elliott and completed in 1915. Its five windows allowed travelers to view the Columbia River while passing through the tunnel. As cars and trucks became larger and more traffic used the highway, the unique tunnel quickly became too small. Initially signals were installed at each end to allow for alternating one-way traffic, but in 1954 a newer road was built below. The tunnel was bricked up and then destroyed in 1966 during widening of the aforementioned road.
 
The last segment of the album focuses on Yellowstone and contains 19 amateur photos, many showing Old Faithful erupting. This portion of the album also includes another 51 photos, measuring 4.5 by 3.5 inches by J.E. Haynes of St. Paul. Haynes (1884-1962) and his father Frank (1853 – 1921) are considered important photo historians of Yellowstone National Park. Their photographs document the early history of the Park. Among the photos in the album are a black and white shot of Gardiner Station train depot as well as convoys of touring cars used to ferry visitors through the park. These were necessary before automobiles and buses were introduced into the park, but are now no longer in existence.
 
Housed in the original full black buckram boards with a string tie. The photographs are clean and bright. Item #64640

Price: $1,750.00

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